Tips

09May 2016
Image showing how to fit artifical grass

If you’re feeling confident enough to give it a go, kudos. Here is a guide on how to fit artificial grass. However, if you’re not feeling confident enough, we have experienced fitters that can get it done in no time for you. Please note: this guide has been provided by a manufacturer of artificial grass. This is not written by Simply Carpets Plymouth. If you’re unsure on any part of the guide, please contact us.

How to fit artificial grass

Artificial Grass1. The existing grass should be dug off & removed.

A turf cutter leaves a good clean level base with which to work from.

2. Mark out the shape & area

Using marking spray or even rope, lay out the area(s) on the ground, and adjust as necessary.

3. Install edging if required

Some areas may already have walls, patios or deck areas which the grass can be laid up against. There are a huge variety of edging systems available such as wood, metal and concrete. Make sure it is secure, and laid to the correct levels along the perimeter.

4. Stabilise & level the ground

Using either coarse grit or type 1 5mm to dust (preferably type1) level the proposed lawn area over, filling in any undulations or holes and using a vibro plate, compact this initial layer in. For the final level, blind the area over once again, ensuring the finished level is no more than 5 – 10mm shallower against the edge than the pile height of the artificial grass you are using. You should now be left with a clean level and stable base.

5. Lay the underlay/membrane

The underlay/membrane can now be laid, cut and pinned into position.

6. Install the artificial grass

Your artificial grass can now be rolled out and positioned accordingly. Ensure that there are no creases before you start cutting in. Once positioned correctly, use a sharp knife to cut the grass tight up to the  edges.

7. Joining the artificial grass sections

On larger areas it may be necessary to have one, or a number of joins to complete the area. The pile direction of the two pieces of grass should face the same way. The next step is to cut the two faces ready for the join.

8a. Cut between the third & fourth stitch lines (option a)

If you are working in the same direction as the stitching lines: Fold the face over. Count three stitches
in along the back of the grass; then cut neatly along between the third and fourth stitch lines. This process
needs to be done to both pieces being joined.

8b. Cut across the stitch lines (option b)

If you are working across the stitch lines: Working from the rear of the grass, slowly cut across the stitch
lines in-between the position where two tufts enter the backing, taking your time to ensure a good, clean,
straight cut. This process needs to be completed on both pieces being joined.

9. Line up the two pieces

Offer the two pieces of grass up to each other, leaving a 2-3mm gap between the two pieces (it may be necessary to trim some areas here in order to ensure a neat fit).

Image showing how to fit artificial grass10. Fold back & tape

Once positioned, fold the two faces back and roll out the tape in-between, ensuring an equal amount of tape under each of the pieces of artificial grass.

11. Apply glue

Glue can now be spread along the jointing tape in a zig-zag fashion. Carefully lower each side of the grass onto the tape, ensuring no glue gets onto the grass.

12. Lay the grass out

See step 6 of how to fit artificial grass.

13. Finishing

Finally, walk along the joint compressing the glue and joint together. With the grass now laid, cut in and  joined (allow the glue to set), if required the area can now be partially sand fi lled using kiln dried sand.  Make sure it is spread evenly over the entire area, with a stiff brush (ideally a mechanical brush). This will allow the fi bres of the grass to stand upright and complete the installation. If you are not in-filling with sand, spray the area over with water then brush over the grass with a stiff broom (ideally a mechanical brush) to allow the pile to stand upright.

There you have it – a guide on how to fit artificial grass! Once you know how to fit artificial grass you can have the lawn of your dreams.

Please remember, this guide of how to fit artificial grass is a guide by Namgrass. The how to fit artificial grass is not created by Simply Carpets Plymouth. If there are any parts of the guide on how to fit artificial grass that you’re unsure on, please contact us.

09Apr 2015
Stressed choosing carpets by colour

Here we have a short guide on choosing carpet for your home. To download the full version and see other downloadable content from Simply Carpets Plymouth, please click here.

Massive_Carpet_Stocks

1. Colours and patterns

Don’t be afraid to try various different colours rather than the base colour you set out with. Sometimes the best colours are the complete opposite to what you imagined.

Patterned carpets can hide every day wear and tear. Perfect for busy homes and offices. Now with a plain carpet, this will show up quite clearly. However, if you have a flecked carpet, stripy carpet or any other type of pattern, this is going to help to mask the accident. Thus, saving you from replacing the carpet at any point down the line.

2. Budget

For a lot of people, it’s the price that makes the main difference. It would come highly recommended to find out what kind of price that you’d be looking at for your carpet. Ensure you budget in all other materials such as gripper rods, spray glue etc.

The easiest way to create a list for your budget would be to visit your local carpet shop.

3. Underlay options

Underlay and carpet go together perfectly. Of course, you can always opt to go without underlay and have your carpet fitted straight to the floor. This is perfect for a carpet with a felt backing. A budget solution for anyone that wants a quick and cheap fix. If it’s softness and longevity that you’re looking for, you’re going to want a quality underlay.

4. Material

Most materials are soft and most will provide warmth. But it’s the hard wearing factor that you need to be mindful of. Wool and 80:20 carpets are highly durable carpets and soft to the touch whereas some man made carpets boast durability, but not softness.

If it’s for a room that you just want longevity in. You want to be looking more towards the man made carpets. You can give a Polypropylene carpet as much abuse as you like and it will just thank you for it. Simply give it a good scrub and it’s back to life. Perfect for high traffic areas including hallways, landings, offices and more.

5. Where to buy?

Ensure you do your research when it comes to the different carpet shops. Throw some questions at the staff. You can expect the staff of a reputable carpet shop to have quick and knowledgeable responses to your questions.

27Jun 2014
image of bedroom carpet

The Carpet Guide

Why Choose Carpet Anyway?

The carpet guide has advice on everything from construction to coloulr so read on…..

Choosing carpet has many benefits, and these have only helped its recent popularity. So use the carpet guide to aid you through the process.

Of course they include the obvious warmth aspect as carpet is the ideal choice for living rooms, family rooms, bedrooms and other areas where warmth is desired – to insulation, where quality carpet really does provide that extra layer of padding, adding to energy efficiency as well as comfort to your home.

Another factor in our carpet guide is safety, as carpet promises a nonslip surface to help prevent accidents and a natural cushion in the event of a fall, as is noise reduction, as carpet dampens noise in three ways:-

  1. Reducing surface noise from foot traffic
  2. Absorbing airborne sound
  3. Blocking transmission of sound between floors – handy for flats.

Carpet Buying Guide

There is also the design and decoration of a room. Carpet can be the main foundation of most room’s design, mainly because it is available in so many textures and colours, carpet creates numerous of possibilities for decorating.

Cheap Carpet Plymouth

The low cost of carpet offers an financial alternative to other flooring solutions such as ceramic, slate and hardwood, and installation costs are typically less than for hard surfaces. Finding cheap carpets in today’s market that are also long-lasting and remarkably durable is not always possible – be warned, but the addition of a cheap carpet to any room can even disguise existing floor problems and hide other imperfections, such as uneven and unlevelled floors.

Different Carpet Constructions

Use the Carpet Guide to select which products you require

Woven carpets

Carpets can be constructed in 1 of 2 ways – weaving or tufting. Although often expensive, woven carpets are made primarily with wool and are extremely robust. Woven carpets can be produced by hand or by machine yet both methods mostly follow the same technique. The yarn is woven through & around vertical fibres called warps, then locked into place with horizontal strands.

Tufted Carpets

90%  of carpets sold today in the UK are constructed using the carpet tufting technique. Tufted carpets are available most colours, designs and textures. Carpet tufting machines use computers to determine many things including:-

  • patterns
  • styles
  • construction
  • density

Once the yarns are in place, the carpet is dyed using a variety of methods to create patterns or effects. For some carpets; at the final stage the yarn is stretched or the loops are cut. This stage will help determine the carpet’s texture  and softness.

Secondary Stretched Backing

Carpet also receives a secondary stretched backing, to give it stability and to allow it to be stretched during installation. Some carpets today also receive stain protection during the manufacturing however it is also very popular to have your carpet professionally treated using products such as Staingard which is but just one of the many services offered by Simply Carpets Plymouth. The quality of a carpet will depend on the type of yarn used, and how that yarn is treated during manufacturing.

The Carpet Guide to Carpet Fibres

Excluding natural materials, nylon, polyester, wool and olefin are the mostly widely used fibres during carpet construction, and each offers qualities useful in specific applications. Nylon is the most expensive type of fibre, it is also soft and resilient, which makes it great for any room in your home especially high traffic and bedrooms.  Its often the choice for parents as man made fibre products have many benefits over natural products as they don’t provoke allergies and dust mites prefer wool to nylon!